Research on Injuries Associated with Strollers and Carriers

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Abstract

Objective
To describe the incidence, rate, and characteristics of injuries associated with strollers and carriers among young children in the United States.

Methods
A retrospective analysis was conducted using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System for children ≤5 years of age treated in emergency departments (1990-2010) who sustained an injury associated with a stroller or carrier.

Results
An estimated 360,937 (95% confidence interval: 294,279-427,594) children aged ≤5 years were treated in emergency departments for stroller- or carrier-related injuries, an average of 17,187 annually. Overall, the rate of stroller- and carrier-related injuries decreased significantly during the study period. Regarding stroller-related injuries, patients were most commonly male (52.4%) and <1 year of age (42.0%); the head (43.0%) and face (31.0%) were most commonly injured. The most common diagnoses were soft-tissue injuries (39.4%) and traumatic brain injuries/concussions (24.6%). Similarly, for carrier-related injuries, patients were most commonly male (52.5%) and <1 year of age (89.0%); the head (61.5%) and face (24.7%) were most commonly injured. The most common diagnoses were soft-tissue injuries (48.1%) and traumatic brain injuries/concussions (34.9%). Carrier-related injuries resulted in more hospitalizations (6.5%) than stroller-related injuries (2.4%).

Conclusions
Stroller- and carrier-related injuries, specifically those resulting from falls from the product or tip-overs, are important sources of injury for children ≤5 years of age. Although injuries over the 21-year study period have decreased overall, the considerable number of injuries annually demonstrates the need to further reduce the potential for injury associated with these ubiquitous products.

Have you or someone you know have experienced a stroller injury?  What tips or advice would you give a soon to be mother and/or father? 


Source:

http://www.academicpedsjnl.net/article/S1876-2859(16)30361-8/abstract

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